Chaser captain for the Central Michigan University quidditch team the Central Centaurs. Harry Potter, quidditch, LOST, Scott Pilgrim, Spider-Man, Doctor Who, and pokemon make up most of my life.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from male1k  62 notes
thenewenlightenmentage:

New Evidence Suggests Pluto Has An Ocean Beneath Its Surface
Astronomers believe that Pluto and its moon were the result of two massive objects slamming into each other. The resulting gravitational dynamic may have warmed the interior of Pluto, creating an ocean comprised of liquid water. Remarkably, this underground sea could still be there.
The idea that Pluto has an ocean underneath its icy surface is not new. Back in 2011, astronomers speculated that, despite its frigid surface temperature, the distant minor-planet could host liquid oceans if two conditions were met. First, it has to have a core rich in potassium to produce enough radioactive decay. And second, the flow of ice on the surface needs to be sufficiently slow-moving (otherwise too much heat would be wasted).
Seems a bit speculative, and it is. But a new scenario, as proposed by Amy Barr and Geoffrey Collins, suggests a different kind of process.
Related: Subsurface oceans on Europa and Enceladus.

thenewenlightenmentage:

New Evidence Suggests Pluto Has An Ocean Beneath Its Surface

Astronomers believe that Pluto and its moon were the result of two massive objects slamming into each other. The resulting gravitational dynamic may have warmed the interior of Pluto, creating an ocean comprised of liquid water. Remarkably, this underground sea could still be there.

The idea that Pluto has an ocean underneath its icy surface is not new. Back in 2011, astronomers speculated that, despite its frigid surface temperature, the distant minor-planet could host liquid oceans if two conditions were met. First, it has to have a core rich in potassium to produce enough radioactive decay. And second, the flow of ice on the surface needs to be sufficiently slow-moving (otherwise too much heat would be wasted).

Seems a bit speculative, and it is. But a new scenario, as proposed by Amy Barr and Geoffrey Collins, suggests a different kind of process.

Related: Subsurface oceans on Europa and Enceladus.